Conservation News

 
 
Life's most persistent and urgent question is:  what are you doing for others?
Martin Luther King Jr 

Visit the World Land Trust's website

The World Land Trust is an international conservation charity that protects the world’s most biologically significant and threatened habitats acre by acre.  Find out how you can get involved and help. 

 RSS Feed

  1. In what I think is an incredibly short time, supporters of UK registered charity the World Land Trust have raised £165,000 towards the purchase of tropical forest.

    I think it was late March 2018 that the appeal was started, and its success was announced on 12 June 2018 on its website.

    This means that the World Land Trust will be able to save 400 acres of tropical forest in the Amazonian Andes of Ecuador. 


    The habitat is home to sloths, cats, hummingbirds, eagles, frogs and macaws.

    The area will be safe under the permanent protection of the World Land Trust’s  local partner, Fundación Jocotoco.  They will be able to make the purchase and protect the 400 acres of tropical rainforest in the Amazonian Andes.  This will extend the existing Narupa Reserve and connect it with nearby national protected areas. 

    The World Land Trust has previously supported extensions through its Action Fund.

    This was an urgent appeal, because there was the danger of a road being built through this ecosystem but the area is now safe. 

    Such was the response of the World Land Trust supporters that the first part of the area was purchased quite early on in the appeal.

    Getting involved gave me a wonderful feeling

    Rather than give me a birthday present, I asked my husband to make a donation on my behalf to this appeal, I can’t tell you how much delight and joy my husband’s present has given me.  I have a warm glow inside my heart every time I think of it. It is a gift that will truly last and be meaningful.  Thank you, my darling!

    I also donated myself to this appeal on behalf of my mother, my sister and I in memory of my wonderful father as an early Father’s Day gift.  This means that Dad’s presence is scattered around the world – he’s now in Ecuador!  He loved making a difference and he adored nature, so this is a great thing to do in his memory.  (He's also in Scotland, Sussex, and a few other places besides, because every Christmas and Father's Day and on his birthday, I do something in his memory - plant a tree, adopt an acre etc).

    It really does make you feel good to contribute to something so many others have and join in the efforts to help conservation and endangered animals.

    The World Land Trust has an action fund you can donate to (if you've missed this appeal above and want to do something) which means that they can respond rapidly to urgent conservation needs.

     

     

  2. Boat owners are going to have anchoring restrictions to protect rare seahorses and marine life.



    There are plans for 41 new marine conservation zones around the coast.   One of those that will receive protection is Studland Bay in Dorset.   It will be protected from yachts and motorboats that moor there.  In Kent, Goodwin Sands (a 10 mile sandbank) will receive similar protection. The Camel Estuary (Cornwall) and the Orford Inshore (off Suffolk) will be protected too.

    In 2008, the Seahorse Trust found 40 seahorses in Studland Bay. 

    In 2018, (last month in fact), the Seahorse Trust found 0 seahorses in Studland Bay.  That’s zero.

    Heavy anchors and their metal chains destroy seagrass, the normal habitat for seahorses.  And the Seahorse Trust says that seahorses should recolonise the area after the seagrass had recovered. 

    The charity says that while serious yachts people don’t anchor on the sea grass, plenty of boat users do.

    Boating enthusiasts protested but the government fortunately over-ruled them. 

    Needless to say, the Royal Yachting Association has said it will impose restrictions, believing that seahorses and recreational boating activities can "reasonably co-exist".

    "Reasonably exist" isn’t good enough.   

    If, over 10 years, the number of seahorses in Studland Bay has plummeted from a find of 40 to 0, there must be a very good reason.

    It’s high time government stepped in, did the right thing and protected wildlife habitat. 

    A good move by the British Government.   Now, more protection for wildlife, please!

    Give wildlife the space and right habitat to thrive, they will. 

     

    Visit the Seahorse Trust and find out how you can help here

      

     

    Seahorses get safety from boats

     

    Boat owners are going to have anchoring restrictions to protect rare seahorses and marine life.

     

    There are plans for 41 new marine conservation zones around the coast.   One of those that will receive protection is Studland Bay in Dorset.   It will be protected from yachts and motorboats that moor there.  In Kent, Goodwin Sands (a 10 mile sandbank) will receive similar protection. The Camel Estuary (Cornwall) and the Orford Inshore (off Suffolk) will be protected too.

     

    In 2008, the Seahorse Trust found 40 seahorses in Sutland Bay. 

     

    In 2018, (last month in fact), the Seahorse Trust found 0 seahorses in Studland Bay.  That’s zero.

     

    Heavy anchors and their metal chains destroy seagrass, the normal habitat for seahorses.  And the Seahorse Trust says that seahorses should recolonise the area after the seagrass had recovered. 

     

    The charity says that while serious yachts people don’t anchor on the sea grass, plenty of boat users do.

     

    Boating enthusiasts protested but the government came to their senses and took no notice of them 

     

    Needless to say, the Royal Yachting Association has said it will impose restrictions, believing that seahorses and recreational boating activities can "reasonably co-exist".

     

    "Reasonably exist" isn’t good enough.   This is yet another example of wildlife suffering from the human race and our activities.  

     

    It isn’t as if leisure boating was an essential activity.  (I should know, because we are boat owners.)  Surviving is.  

     

    If, over 10 years, the number of seahorses in Studland Bay has plummeted from a find of 40 to 0, there must be a very good reason.

     

    And with so many people just not caring at all about nature (and it’s not just boat owners, of course) or even thinking about what they are doing and the impact they are having, it’s high time government stepped in, did the right thing and protected wildlife habitat.

     

    A good move by the British Government.   Now, more protection, please!

     

    Give wildlife the space and right habitat to thrive, they will. 

     

     

     

     



  3. It’s National Gardening Week, and this is a great chance to raise awareness of opportunities to get gardening!

    Did you know that there are a number of different gardening campaigns to get people gardening?

    A couple of my favourite are from the RHS, that’s the Royal Horticultural Society – Britain’s main gardening charity.   The RHS is known for its world famous RHS  flower shows such as RHS Chelsea, RHS Hampton Court and RHS Tatton Park; and also for campaigns such as Britain in Bloom which helps build local communities.  

    But there’s also a couple of others which I think are really important from the RHS and other gardening charities so here there are:

    Greening Grey Britain

    As Britain gets more and more concrete, and there’s more and more building, so it’s really important to look after and create new green spaces.   Gardens are crucial, and they are also an essential way to help wildlife.  Wildlife are losing more and more habitat to human activity.  What’s more, the more land we concrete over, the more risk at flooding we are and the more we damage the environment and our health.

    So the RHS is running a campaign to encourage people to get Greening Grey Britain.   You could for example:

    • Plant a tree
    • Plant a shrub
    • Plant a flower bed
    • Plant a window box or a container
    • Plant a climber
    • Do something else

    The RHS are hoping that 6,000 people will join in this campaign – so far over 2,800 people have done just that.  


    Wild About Gardens

    Wild About Gardens is a joint initiative by the RHS and The Wildlife Trusts to get more people growing for wildlife.  This year, the theme is Go Wild For Worms – they are essential to life and a gardener’s best friend.  They are also essential food for wildlife. 

    Campaign for School Gardening

    Young people are clearly the gardeners of tomorrow but more importantly I think they are going to be the guardians of our planet.   Frankly, and this is just a personal view, I hope they do a better job of it than my generation have done. 

    The RHS Campaign for School Gardening inspires and supports schools to give children with gardening opportunities to enhance their skills and boost their development.  Children love gardening and it does them so much good.  

    Horticulture Matters

    The RHS is looking to tackle the crisis in the horticultural industry in the UK which is suffering from a growing skills crisis.   It’s working to improve the perception of careers in the sector, to support schools in the delivery of horticultural qualifications and to work with the Government to secure funding for plant-science research.

    It’s your Neighbourhood

    Over 2,000 community groups participate in this gardening campaign – caring for parks, greening street corners, revamping alleyways and basically creating greener, safer places for everyone to live with a fresh community spirit.

    Pots for Pollinators

    This campaign is run by Butterfly Conservation and it’s asking people to Plant a pot for a pollinator – butterflies, bees etc. 

    Just Add Water

    Just Add Water is a national campaign to encourage the public to dig wildlife ponds, especially in urban environments.  There's been a huge loss of countryside ponds in recent years so hopefully this will help local frogs and newts and other wildlife to survive and thrive.  Efforts locally can make a big difference and Froglife have created the Just Add Water campaign to help give advice and tips.  

     

  4. The Snow Leopard Trust works to protect this endangered cat through community-based conservation projects


    The Snow Leopard Trust works to protect this endangered cat through community-based conservation projects.

    The Snow Leopard Trust have dedicated 1 May 2018 as a Spot-tacular!   It’s an online day to thanking its supporters and recognising them as an integral part of their team.

    To celebrate, they are sharing their annual Impact Report

    The support the Trust’s supporters have provided have meant that…..

    There’s more information here but it’s great to hear from a charity of the impact support has. 

    Visit the Snow Leopard Trust’s website to see how you can make a difference to these magnificent animals here.

    Spring into Action

    The Snow Leopard Trust  is currently working to raise $60,000 to expand their programmes and they are running appeals for a couple of projects:

    One to support wildlife rangers - Help equip and pay two rangers who patrol the Shamshy Wildlife Sanctuary in Kyrgyzstan to prevent illegal hunting and monitor wildlife populations

    Counting the cats – they are looking to come up with a solid estimate of the snow leopard population in Himachal Pradesh, one of five Indian states which have snow leopards

    Adopt a Snow LeopardAdopt a Snow Leopard